Pain is an unfortunate part of life for many of our pets. Dogs and cats are much better at hiding their pain than people, and it can go unnoticed for a long period of time. Pain is often a debilitating condition which slows healing, interferes with immune system function, and  decreases our pets’ quality of life.

Some signs of pain include limping, change in walking style, not wanting to jump up (especially cats), lack of grooming or overgrooming/licking a particular area, not wanting to be touched or brushed, difficulty settling, loss of appetite, sleeping more, and unexplained aggression.

What type of treatments does the Pain Clinic offer?

– pain medication for acute conditions and chronic conditions

– post-operative pain management

– epidurals and nerve blocks for surgical patients

– acupuncture, including electroacupuncture

– active and passive exercises, massage therapy

– laser therapy

Who should consider treatment through the Pain Clinic?

Patients with the following conditions would benefit:

– arthritis

– musculoskeletal injuries

– pre- and post-operative orthopaedic patients

– cancer patients

– patients with disc disease/back problems

– any other type of chronic pain, eg mouth pain with stomatitis in cats

What is acupuncture?

Acupuncture is the use of very fine needles, inserted through the skin, to stimulate nerve endings all over the body. Depending on the location of the stimulated nerve, acupuncture can provide pain relief, muscle relaxation, and affect circulation, hormone release, and internal organ function.

Which conditions can be treated using acupuncture?

Acupuncture is most commonly used to treat musculoskeletal problems such as arthritis and disc disease/back problems, to aid recovery following orthopaedic surgery, for neurological problems (including seizures), incontinence, cystitis, eye problems, kidney disease, and can greatly improve quality of life for cancer patients and older pets. Acupuncture can safely be used alongside Western treatments, or in some cases instead of them.

How often should my pet have acupuncture?

The number of treatments a patient will require depends on the type and severity of condition being treated, and whether it is a chronic problem like arthritis or kidney failure, or an acute problem, like a joint injury. Most patients are initially treated weekly for 4-6 weeks, and patients with chronic conditions are expected to need maintenance treatments at intervals of a few weeks or even months. Acute injuries may be treated more frequently, but for a shorter period of time.

Is acupuncture safe?

Side-effects are minimal – some patients may feel sleepy and tired for a few hours after the treatment. Just as not every patient will respond to Western treatments, there is also the occasional patient who does not seem to respond to acupuncture.

Who runs the Pain Clinic?

Dalya Livy BVSc MVS CertVA CertSAM PGDip(PainMgt) MRCVS has 18 years of experience as a veterinary surgeon, holds an RCVS Certificate in Veterinary Anaesthesia, has undergone acupuncture training with International Veterinary Acupuncture Society, and holds a postgraduate diploma in Pain Management from the University of Edinburgh School of Medicine. She has previously run pain clinics at Southern Counties Veterinary Specialists referral hospital in Ringwood

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Caring For Your Pet

We can meet your pet’s every need, from the first puppy or kitten (and bunny or gecko!) health check, through preventative care, to the most complicated investigation and treatment when they are unwell. We have the advanced facilities and expert knowledge you may expect from a much larger practice, and yet our small size allows us to retain the friendly, comfortable, and caring atmosphere we are known for.

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